Google+  

As a car owner, you may be very aware of the engine and oil filter, but did you know that modern cars often have a cabin filter? You may carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for getting the oiled changed and your filters replaced; take the same care in maintaining your cabin air filter. This small piece of equipment prevents dust, pollen, dirt, and pollutants from getting inside your vehicle where you and your passengers breathe it in. Fortunately, it isn’t too hard to swap out the filter for a replacement, but first, you need to know how to recognize it’s time for a change.

Annual Replacement

Most manufacturers recommend fresh replacements once a year or every 15,000 miles, whichever comes first. Whether your commute takes you through congested city streets or down dusty farm roads, the filter traps a lot of pollution. If you don’t notice any other signs of trouble, keep your eye on the odometer and the calendar.

Bad Smells

If you notice a moldy smell inside the vehicle, you may want to check the filter. In cars where it is situated beneath the windshield, any gap in the waterproof seal could allow moisture into the filter. A damp-smelling car should prompt a visual inspection of the filter and the seal.

Reduced Air Flow

Another sign that it’s time for a change is a noticeable reduction in your heating and cooling air flow. As the filter gets clogged by bugs, leaves, dirt, and dust, there’s less room for the air to flow through. When you notice this drop in air flow, you should get the filter changed as soon as possible. The harder your vehicle has to work, the more potential there is for wear and tear. To know more, click here.

Talk to Your Mechanic

If you don’t know where your filter is, have your mechanic show it to you. Advice from the mechanic can help you watch out for trouble, reducing the need for replacements and repairs. Once you’ve found it, shine a flashlight through the filter. If the light gets through, you can continue using it. You may also be able to get a glimpse of sunshine through the filter, eliminating the need for a flashlight test. If the light doesn’t pass through, grab a screwdriver to remove the cover or pop off the clips. Pull out the filter and replace it with a new, clean version.

Once you learn where your cabin filter is, how to recognize that it needs to be replaced, and how to remove it, you’ll be glad to learn that these filters are affordable and easy to purchase. Protect the air inside your car and keep your vehicle running smoothly with some TLC for the cabin air filter.

Be the first to like.

Be Sociable, Share!

    Author: Eric Spence

    Share This Post On

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Shares